Show appreciation to all who help or perform well

“Bonuses get spent, titles get old, but a thank you lingers”

Larry Page has his own “Reasons to work at Google.” It says things like, “We love our employees and we want them to know it,” and “Appreciation is the best motivation.”

Janice Kaplan, author of a new book called The Gratitude Diaries, says companies are setting a thank-you trend, mainly because expressions of gratitude in the workplace are scarce.

In just one survey, 80 percent of people said that receiving gratitude or appreciation for their work makes them want to work harder.

An analysis of 50 studies by the London School of Economics shows that people give their best effort if they are interested or excited about their work, but especially if others appreciate what they are doing.

At the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School, Professor Adam Grant divides people into three categories: Takers do something if they will get something in return.

Matchers are always playing the corporate game.

Givers contribute to others without looking for a reward. They offer help, advice and knowledge. While many workplaces have a competitive atmosphere, givers can also end up on top. Those who combine giving to others with awareness of their own needs can be the most successful of all, Dr. Grant says.

It’s not just managers who should show appreciation. Co-workers can make a difference with a simple “I appreciate that,” when dealing with others.